Rather Than Complain About Amateurs…

(written for a Linkedin Video Group)

Like many of you, I follow quite a few related blogs on Linkedin and elsewhere.

So this is not a criticism of this one.

But doubtless you’ve seen your fair share of soulful but utterly irrelevant chatter about amateurs driving down prices and quality of video production.

If you take a moment to check out the actual work of the complainers (on their sites), you probably won’t very often find the work of a true professional. I’d wager you never will.

So rather than complain, if you are a professional, why not teach what you know?

With some 30 years experience in the fields of cinematography and video, I learned a few things from a combination of study of the basics texts on the subjects, mentoring from a master and then years of working it all out in the real world.

After a year or two of reading too much aggravating drivel about amateurs, I decided to start a blog called “The Video Whisperer” (https://thevideowhisperer.wordpress.com/).

More recently I started to focus it more toward exactly what I said above:

Why not teach what you know?

A month ago I started with the first video tutorial series  “Lighting for Video That Doesn’t Suck”.  The first one dealt with the fundamentals behind lighting.  I got some great feedback from professionals and amateurs alike. Many noted that there was information in there that they had never heard before. And so it will be with the rest of them.

This week I’m going to complete several more in that series, the first one specifically on 3 point lighting.

I’d like to invite anyone who wants to learn the basics cinematic lighting to subscribe to the blog so that you are the first to know when the new videos are up (which should be in a few days). Meanwhile you can watch the first one that’s already up.

The Lighting series will cover the fundamentals of lighting, the mechanics of 3 point lighting, lighting in the real world, kit and some vital technical subjects which themselves are fundamental to lighting.

Later series will cover the subjects of camerawork and composition–including, I promise you, things you will probably never have heard before.

And all of it will both give you the fundamentals and techniques which will enable you to produce professional cinematic-quality video without having to spend thousands on kit.

Promise.

Subscribe at https://thevideowhisperer.wordpress.com/

Warm regards,

Joe

The Video Whisperer

Lighting For Video That Doesn’t Suck

Finally.

I’ve been wanting to do some tutorial videos for a long time. Finally was able to get one done. This one is on lighting for video.

I, like many in the video production field, follow a number of different blogs on the subject of video and marketing.  If you’ve been there, you’ve seen the periodic rants from “professionals” about amateurs coming into the arena with cut prices and little talent with further rants about how the general business public are tolerating amateur video quality.

Like in politics, there’s a grain of truth in that.

And like politics, there are very few professionals left. In politics they used to be called “Statesmen”. And true statesmen never bothered too much with the general rants of press and opposition. They’d just get on with the job and improve things, educate and  lead people by example.

One of the untruths is that the general business public accept low quality. They don’t. Just low quality businesses do. And who wants them for clients anyway?

So maybe there’d be some benefit in providing some real practical knowledge so that those current amateurs (aspiring professionals) can learn a few of the basic conventions that have evolved over the past 100 years or so which form the bedrock of what makes a quality film or video that people will actually want to watch.

Part One is below. Part Two can be found here.

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